Month: December 2018

Medical Cannabis Use Associated With Reduced Opioid Use In Pain Patients, Finds Study

The use of medical cannabis for at least a month is associated with reduced opioid use in pain patients, according to a new study.

The study, titled Opioid dose reduction and pain control with medical cannabis, was published by the Journal of Clinical Oncology. It was conducted by researchers at the Kymera Independent Physicians medical group.

For the study, “A retrospective cohort was evaluated to understand the pattern of care and QOL [quality of life] outcomes with MC [medical cannabis] use across rural multidisciplinary practices in New Mexico. ” QOL questionnaire included a graded pain scale, and “morphine equivalent (ME) dose was used to estimate changes in opioid dose.” ODR was defined “as any reduction of baseline opioid dose.” A chi-square was performed to evaluate associations.

“A total of 133 patients were identified between Jan 2017- May 2017. (M/F) 65/68; median age of 53 (range 20 – 84)”, states the study. “Nineteen percent (25/133) had a cancer diagnosis. Pain score improved in 80 % of patients with cancer and in 75% (64/89) of non-cancer patients (x2 0.24 p = 0.62).”

Opioid dose reduction (ODR) was achieved in 41% of all patients using medical cannabis. Of these, “63% (34/54) had a 25% ODR and 37% (20/54) had 26% or more ODR (x2 12.8 p = 0.002). In cancer patients, a 25% ODR was achieved in 73% (x2 0.51 p = 0.771).”

Researchers state that “All patients (15/15) using MC and high dose opioid (morphine equivalent ≥ 50 mg/day) had some ODR. Co-adjuvant NSAIDs [nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug] with MC improved pain score in 67% of all cases vs 33% among non-NSAID cohort (x2 10.7 p = 0.001). ODR was achieved in 32% of patients with active depression vs 68% of patients without (x2 0.044 p = 0.83).”

The study concludes by stating that “In this rural cohort, MC use led to ODR in 41% of all patients.”

Click here for more information on this study.

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What the 2018 Farm Bill Could Mean for CBD in California

The federal 2018 Farm Bill is likely to become law in the very near future. If it does, it will redefine the hemp industry nationwide. We intend on writing more in the near future as to the specifics of the 2018 Farm Bill, but one interesting question is what effect it will have on California’s industrial hemp and CBD policies.

As anyone in the California hemp business knows, the Department of Public Health (“CDPH”) issued a FAQ policy guideline over the summer which took the position that industrial-hemp derived CBD in food products is unlawful. The FAQ justified this position in part because the federal Controlled Substances Act included industrial hemp as a Schedule I drug, and in part because the federal Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) had concluded that it was unlawful to place THC or CBD into food products.

The 2018 Farm Bill, if it passes, will essentially amend the Controlled Substances Act to take industrial hemp out of the definition of marijuana. In essence, this would make industrial hemp derived products lawful products. The question then is: Will the 2018 Farm Bill negate the FAQ?

The answer is probably not. Even though the Controlled Substances Act may be amended and some of the underlying support for the FAQ may be undermined, that won’t change the fact that the FDA has not concluded that CBD in food products is lawful. While the CDPH certainly could change its position, the de-scheduling of industrial hemp won’t necessarily change the FDA’s positions right away. In the meantime, it’s safe to conclude that the FAQ still stands.

Ultimately, the 2018 Farm Bill is likely to have far-reaching impacts throughout the industrial hemp industry. We’ll make sure to keep you updated along the way.

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Study: Marijuana Stores Associated With Increased Home Values

Medical and recreational marijuana dispensaries are associated with a significant increase in home value, according to a new study published by the journal Contemporary Economic Policy.

(Photo: DenverHomeLender.com).

For the study, titled The effect of marijuana dispensary openings on housing prices, researchers evaluated “the effect of medical and recreational dispensary openings on housing prices in Denver, Colorado.” Using an “event study approach”, they found that “the introduction of a new dispensary within a half‐mile radius of a new home increases home prices by approximately 7.7% on average.”

The study notes that this effect “diminishes for homes further from new dispensaries but is consistent over time.” Researchers conclude by stating that “Our results provide important and timely empirical evidence on the socioeconomic impacts of marijuana legalization.”

More information on this study, conducted by researchers at Colorado State University, can be found by clicking here.

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