Oregon Garners $9 Million in Marijuana Taxes in May

Oregon garnered $9 million in marijuana taxes in May.

According to the state’s Department of Revenue, Oregon garnered $8,868,932 in marijuana sales taxes in May. Only one time in the state’s history has more marijuana tax revenue been garnered in a single month (January of this year with $9.3 million).

Of the $9 million in taxes garnered in May, $7.8 million came from a 17% statewide sales tax, with the remaining $1.2 million coming from citywide taxes (which under law can be as high as 3%).

Oregon is currently on tract to garner roughly $100 million in marijuana taxes for all of 2018. This would mark a 47% increase from the $68 million in taxes the state brought in from legal marijuana sales in 2017.

In Oregon the possession of up to an ounce of marijuana is legal for those 21 and older, thanks to a citizen’s initiative passed in 2014. The state has a licenses and regulated system of marijuana businesses, including retail outlets.

The post Oregon Garners $9 Million in Marijuana Taxes in May appeared first on TheJointBlog.

Read More

Study: Cannabis May Help Treat Sickle Cell Disease

Cannabis may be a potential treatment option for those with sickle cell disease, according to a new study published on the website of the National Institute of Health.

(Photo: KidsHealth.org).

“Legal access to marijuana, most frequently as “medical marijuana,” is becoming more common in the United States, but most states do not specify sickle cell disease as a qualifying condition”, states the study. “We were aware that some of our patients living with sickle cell disease used illicit marijuana, and we sought more information about this.” Sickle cell disease, according to Mayo Clinic, is “A group of disorders that cause red blood cells to become misshapen and break down.”

For the study, researchers “practice at an urban, academic medical center and provide primary, secondary, and tertiary care for ∼130 adults living with sickle cell disease. We surveyed our patients with a brief, anonymous, paper-and-pen instrument.” They “reviewed institutional records for clinically driven urine drug testing” and “tracked patient requests for certification for medical marijuana.”

Among 58 patients surveyed, 42% reported marijuana use within the past 2 years. Among users, “most endorsed five medicinal indications; a minority reported recreational use.” Among 57 patients who had at least one urine drug test, 18% tested positive for cannabinoids only, 12% tested positive for cocaine and/or phencyclidine only, and 5% tested positive for both cannabinoids and cocaine/phencyclidine.

“Our findings and those of others create a rationale for research into the possible therapeutic effects of marijuana or cannabinoids, the presumed active constituents of marijuana, in sickle cell disease”, states researchers. “Explicit inclusion of sickle cell disease as a qualifying condition for medical marijuana might reduce illicit marijuana use and related risks and costs to both persons living with sickle cell disease and society.”

More information on this study, including its full text, can be found by clicking here.

The post Study: Cannabis May Help Treat Sickle Cell Disease appeared first on TheJointBlog.

Read More

Oklahoma AG Says Board of Health Doesn’t Have Authority to Ban Smoking Medical Marijuana

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter sent out a press release today stating that the Board of Health’s recent ban on smoking medical marijuana is beyond their authority.

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter.

“The current rules contain provisions that are inconsistent with the plain language of State Question 788 and the State Board of Health acted outside of its authority when it voted to implement them,” Hunter said in a Wednesday press release, referencing the Board’s recent vote to alter the voter-approved initiative to ban smoking medical marijuana despite the initiative clearly allowing it.

“Although I didn’t support State Question 788, the people of the state have spoken and I have a legal duty to honor the decision made by the electorate”, says Hunter. “My advice today is made pursuant to that responsibility as attorney general.”

Hunter has called on the Board of Health to immediately convene a special meeting in order to amend the rules to be in line with the will of State Question 788.

The post Oklahoma AG Says Board of Health Doesn’t Have Authority to Ban Smoking Medical Marijuana appeared first on TheJointBlog.

Read More

Hemp-Derived CBD Not Allowed in Food (or Pretty Much Anything Else) in California

Last week, the California Department of Public Health’s Food and Drug Branch (CDPH-FDB) issued a revised FAQ on cannabidiol (CBD) in food products that will likely block the sale of hemp-derived CBD products in California — which if you’ve been in the state lately, are pretty much already everywhere.

CDPH-FDB has determined that CBD sourced from industrial hemp cannot be added to food (including drinks) for either humans or pets:

[A]lthough California currently allows the manufacturing and sales of cannabis products (including edibles), the use of industrial hemp as the source of CBD to be added to food products is prohibited. Until the FDA rules that industrial hemp-derived CBD oil and CBD products can be used as a food or California makes a determination that they are safe to use for human and animal consumption, CBD products are not an approved food, food ingredient, food additive, or dietary supplement.

California’s Health and Safety Code defines “food” as “a raw, cooked, or processed edible substance, ice, beverage, an ingredient used or intended for use or for sale in whole or in part for human consumption, and chewing gum.” Further, CDPH-FDB’s FAQ elaborates on what will not be allowed in food in California as follows:

  • Any CBD products derived from cannabis
  • Any CBD products, including CBD oil derived from industrial hemp
  • Hemp oil not derived from industrial hemp seeds
  • Industrial hemp seed oil enhanced with CBD or other cannabinoids
Seeds derived from industrial hemp and oil made from industrial hemp seeds are allowed in food if the distributor of those items makes no medical claims about the seeds and/or oil.
CDPH-FDB also made the following distinction between “hemp seed oil” and CBD oil:
Industrial hemp seed oil and hemp-derived CBD oil are two different products. Industrial hemp seed oil is derived from the seeds limited to types of the Cannabis sativa L. plant and may contain trace amounts of CBD (naturally occurring) and other cannabinoids. Food grade Industrial hemp seed oil is available from a variety of approved sources.
However, CBD or CBD oil derived from industrial hemp is NOT approved for human and animal consumption by the FDA as food and therefore cannot be used as a food ingredient, food additive, or dietary supplement.
CDPH-FDB confirmed in is FAQ that “there is no regulatory agency that provides oversight for the production of CBD oil from industrial hemp,” but CDPH does have authority over food and dietary use products generally and, therefore, food products containing CBD oil are within its authority to regulate. The FAQ also adds that “CBD is an unapproved food additive and NOT allowed for use in human and animal foods in California regardless of where the CBD products originate.” So, no out-of-state hemp-CBD loophole.
CDPH-FDB distinguished cannabis edibles sold under MAUCRSA and regulated by CDPH’s Manufactured Cannabis Safety Branch from non-cannabis food products sold outside of that regulatory framework. Yet in another blow to hemp-CBD, the Bureau of Cannabis Control will not allow MAUCRSA-licensed retailers to sell stand alone hemp-CBD products even though BCC rules explicitly allow for selling non-cannabis products at licensed retail storefronts.

The FAQ also addresses the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which has a complicated relationship with CBD. The FDA states in its own THC/CBD FAQs that it is prohibited to “introduce or deliver for introduction into interstate commerce any food (including any animal food or feed) to which THC or CBD has been added.” The FDA has also sent out cease and desist letters (see here, here, and here) to CBD producers and sellers across the country that were making medical claims about their CBD products in violation of the Federal Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act . The FDA takes the position that CBD is neither a conventional food nor a supplement exempt from drug testing. Recently though the FDA approved Epidiolex, the cannabis-based drug used to treat severe forms of epilepsy. This approval does not mean the FDA now allows for all CBD products or that it will now allow businesses to make medical claims about CBD for products that have not been approved as drugs under the Federal Food Drug & Cosmetic Act –in other words, anything containing CBD that is not Epidiolex.

Essentially, California is letting the FDA dictate what it will do with hemp CBD. Though many other states allow hemp CBD for human consumption pursuant to Federal Farm Bill programs, California is following nearly lock-step with big brother on this one. How exactly CDPH-FDB plans to enforce its FAQ is not clear given that hemp CBD products are already rampant in California.

Our CBD lawyers will continue monitoring this evolving situation as hemp CBD makers and sellers struggle to navigate and comply.

Read More

Study: CBD May Be Useful In Treating Breast Cancer

CBD may be a useful treatment for various breast cancer subtypes, according to a new study published by the journal The Breast.

“Studies have emphasized an antineoplastic effect of the non-psychoactive, phyto-cannabinoid, Cannabidiol (CBD)”, begins the study’s abstract, which was epublished ahead of print by the National Institute of Health. “However, the molecular mechanism underlying its antitumor activity is not fully elucidated. Herein, we have examined the effect of CBD on two different human breast cancer cell lines”.

In both cell lines, “CBD inhibited cell survival and induced apoptosis in a dose dependent manner as observed by MTT assay, morphological changes, DNA fragmentation and ELISA apoptosis assay.”

The results “suggest that CBD treatment induces an interplay among PPARγ, mTOR and cyclin D1 in favor of apoptosis induction in both ER-positive and triple negative breast cancer cells, proposing CBD as a useful treatment for different breast cancer subtypes.”

The full study, conducted by researchers at Alexandria University in Egypt, can be found by clicking here.

The post Study: CBD May Be Useful In Treating Breast Cancer appeared first on TheJointBlog.

Read More

Labeling CBD Products: The Unique Case of Indiana

Home of legal CBD sales!

Indiana has uniquely positioned itself with some of the most robust regulations of hemp-derived CBD products. On March 21, 2018, Senate Bill 52 became law, allowing the distribution and retail sale of “low-THC hemp extract,” defined as a product “(1) derived from Cannabis sativa L. that meets the definition of industrial hemp; (2) that contains not more than 0.3% delta-9-THC (including precursors); and (3) that contains no other controlled substances.”

Exciting news, right? Indiana is a red state that has been slow to implement any kind of meaningful cannabis regulations. Prior to SB 52, Indiana implemented a strict CBD-only medical marijuana program and an industrial hemp program that has not really launched.

That’s what makes SB 52 so interesting. It shows that Indiana is cognizant of the existence of CBD products and has made a decision to allow their sale. The catch is that those sales are restricted to a certain class of CBD products, and they are heavily regulated.

Specifically, under SB 52, “low-THC hemp extracts” are only permitted for sale in Indiana if they are extracted from hemp that was tested by an accredited, independent laboratory. The distributor of low THC hemp extracts must have lab results showing “(1) the low THC hemp extract is the product of a batch tested by the independent testing laboratory; and (2) the independent testing laboratory determined that the batch contained not more than three-tenths percent (0.3%) total [THC], including precursors, by weight, based on the testing of a random sample of the batch.”

Assuming these products clear testing, the sellers of low THC hemp products must distribute them in packaging that includes the following:

(1) A scannable bar code or QR code linked to a document that contains information with respect to the manufacture of the low THC hemp extract, including the:

(A) batch identification number;

(B) product name;

(C) batch date;

(D) expiration date, which must be not more than two years from the date of manufacture;

(E) batch size;

(F) total quantity produced;

(G) ingredients used, including the:

(i) ingredient name;

(ii) name of the company that manufactured the ingredient;

(iii) company or product identification number or code, if applicable; and

(iv) ingredient lot number; and

(H) download link for a certificate of analysis for the low THC hemp extract.

(2) The batch number.

(3) The Internet address of a web site to obtain batch information.

(4) The expiration date.

(5) The number of milligrams of low THC hemp extract.

(6) The manufacturer.

(7) The fact that the product contains not more than three-tenths percent (0.3%) totaldelta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), including precursors, by weight.

That may read like a long list, but it’s roughly equivalent to what we see as far as packaging and labeling requirements for cannabis products in Washington, Oregon and California, the states in which our cannabis business attorneys are located.

This will also prove challenging for distributors who send products across the country as they now must consider Indiana’s labeling requirements. This will likely lead to some CBD distributors deciding not to sell products in Indiana. Other’s may choose to comply with Indiana’s labeling restrictions and place Indiana-complaint labels on products that are made available in other states.

Indiana is unique in the sense that it allows CBD and also regulates its sale so robustly. Let’s hope for more positive cannabis developments in the Hoosier State.

Read More

Study: Eating Raw Cannabis Associated With Significant Improvements in Insomnia Patients

Consuming “raw, natural medical cannabis flower” is associated with “significant improvements” in insomnia patients, finds a new study published by the open access journal Medicines.

For the study 409 people with a specified condition of insomnia completed 1056 medical cannabis administration sessions using the Releaf AppTM educational software during which they recorded real-time ratings of “self-perceived insomnia severity levels prior to and following consumption, experienced side effects, and product characteristics, including combustion method, cannabis subtypes, and/or major cannabinoid contents of cannabis consumed.” Within-user effects of different flower characteristics were modeled using “a fixed effects panel regression approach with standard errors clustered at the user level.”

Researchers found that “Releaf AppTM users showed an average symptom severity reduction of -4.5 points on a 0⁻10 point visual analogue scale.” Use of pipes and vaporizers was associated with “greater symptom relief and more positive and context-specific side effects as compared to the use of joints, while vaporization was also associated with lower negative effects.” Cannabidiol (CBD) “was associated with greater statistically significant symptom relief than tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), but the cannabinoid levels generally were not associated with differential side effects.”

The study concludes; “Consumption of medical Cannabis flower is associated with significant improvements in perceived insomnia with differential effectiveness and side effect profiles, depending on the product characteristics.”

For the full study, click here.

The post Study: Eating Raw Cannabis Associated With Significant Improvements in Insomnia Patients appeared first on TheJointBlog.

Read More

When marijuana is legal in Canada, Americans are expected to flock. But the border, and US law, stands in the way.

BLAINE, Wash. – Recreational marijuana has been legal here in Washington state since 2014. Adults just a few miles away in Canada also will be able to legally buy and smoke marijuana for pleasure starting in October.

The post When marijuana is legal in Canada, Americans are expected to flock. But the border, and US law, stands in the way. appeared first on The Cannabist.

Read More

Study: Cannabis Causes Death of Colon Cancer Cells

According to a new study published by the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, and published online by the U.S. National Institute of Health, cannabis can cause the death of colon cancer cells, implying that it may be a potential treatment option for the disease.

“Colorectal cancer remains the third most common cancer diagnosis and fourth leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide”, begins the abstract of the study. “Purified cannabinoids have been reported to prevent proliferation, metastasis, and induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell types. However, the active compounds from Cannabis sativa flowers and their interactions remain elusive.” This study was “aimed to specify the cytotoxic effect of C. sativa-derived extracts on colon cancer cells and adenomatous polyps by identification of active compound(s) and characterization of their interaction.”

For the study, ethanol extracts of C. sativa were “analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry and their cytotoxic activity was determined using alamarBlue-based assay (Resazurin) and tetrazolium dye-based assay (XTT) on cancer and normal colon cell lines and on dysplastic adenomatous polyp cells.”

Researchers found that “The unheated cannabis extracts (C2F), fraction 7 (F7), and fraction 3 (F3) had cytotoxic activity on colon cancer cells”. Moreover, the extracts induced cell death of polyp cells.”

The study concludes by stating that “C. sativa compounds interact synergistically for cytotoxic activity against colon cancer cells and induce cell cycle arrest, apoptotic cell death, and distinct gene expression”. The study’s results suggest “possible future therapeutic value.”

The full study can be found by clicking here.

The post Study: Cannabis Causes Death of Colon Cancer Cells appeared first on TheJointBlog.

Read More
Loading