Hemp Stakeholders Share Their Thoughts with the USDA

Last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (“USDA”) held a public meeting during which hemp stakeholders shared their opinion on the promulgation of rules to regulate the crop.

Pursuant to the 2018 Farm Bill, which legalized hemp by descheduling the crop under the Controlled Substance Act, the USDA is tasked with overseeing and regulating the production of hemp in the United States. Specifically, the federal agency is to review and approve “plans” submitted by states and Indian tribes that choose to hold primary regulatory authority over hemp. However, before the federal agency may begin reviewing these plans, the agency must formalize rules with which states and Indian tribes plans must comply. As of the date of this memo, only a handful of states and Indian tribes have submitted their plans.

Roughly 50 speakers, including state governments, Indian tribe representatives, and stakeholders in the supply chain of hemp, shared their thoughts during the three-hour long webinar. All expressed concerns regarding testing procedures, interstate transportation of the crop, access to banking, and guidance from the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”). Here is a summary of what each group had to say:

States

Several state Departments of Agriculture, including Pennsylvania, Kentucky, and Wisconsin, expressed great concerns regarding testing and access to banking. Ryan Quarles, Commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, explained that hemp farmers and companies need access to capital “just like any other farmer or agri-business.” Quarles also called for guidance from the FDA regarding its position on CBD derived from industrial hemp:

If the FDA regulates too hard against CBD, it would really harm small Kentucky family farms … We’ve got to develop rules that allow our farmers an opportunity to continue supporting this crop and benefitting economically from it, especially during a period of depressed farm cash receipts.”

Indian Tribes

Although the USDA expects to release these rules by the 2020 growing season, Indian tribes urged the USDA to do so before the end of the 2019 harvest season. Because Indian tribes are not currently allowed to grow hemp pursuant to the 2014 Farm Bill, which strictly limits hemp cultivation within state borders, pushing the release of the rules until fall would further delay tribes’ access to the market and put them at a financial disadvantage.

Supply Chain Stakeholders

The primary concern shared by stakeholders involved in the supply chain pertained to the likely confusion by state enforcement officials in differentiating hemp from marijuana. Indeed, as reflected in recent events, local enforcement groups have struggled to differentiate the plants as they look and smell alike. This issue partially stems from the technologically inadequate field kits currently available, which only detect whether THC is present, regardless of its concentration. Such confusion, industry players held, will continue to lead to unnecessary delays and mistaken arrests.

This public meeting was the first step toward the USDA issuing a proposed regulation in the implementation of the 2018 Farm Bill. Next month, the FDA will hold a similar public meeting to hear directly from stakeholders regarding the regulation of CBD-infused food and dietary supplements. We will summarize the meeting after it occurs. Stay tuned!

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California Hemp Cultivation: It’s Complicated

Our California hemp lawyers regularly get asked about the laws and regulations about growing hemp in California, manufacturing hemp products, and shipping those products around the country. I’ve written about the various hemp laws in California and how confusing they are previously (see here and here). Those posts, however, were more geared towards the manufacture and sale of hemp-derived cannabidiol (“Hemp CBD”) products than the actual cultivation of hemp, which is becoming an increasingly important topic in the hemp industry in the wake of the federal Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018 (or “2018 Farm Bill”).

The reality is that California is far behind many other states when it comes to hemp. There are very few laws or regulations here on hemp and Hemp CBD, and most of them take a very restrictive view towards what kinds of products are allowed to be sold. There is actual law on the books for cultivation, but it mostly sat there for a few years and is only now coming to light.

To understand the current state of hemp cultivation in California, we need to look back a few years. In 2013, California passed Senate Bill 566, the California Industrial Hemp Farming Act (or “CIHFA”). The CIHFA amended the Health and Safety Code to redefine “marijuana” to exclude industrial hemp, and to statutorily define industrial hemp. It also added a section to the Food and Agriculture Code that would regulate the production of hemp by established agricultural research institutions and commercial cultivators. This latter section was not immediately effective and was subject to federal law authorizing it.

The next year, the federal Agricultural Act of 2014 (or “2014 Farm Bill”) was passed. As readers of this blog probably know by now, section 7606 of the 2014 Farm Bill allowed the cultivation of hemp for research purposes conducted under an agricultural pilot program or by a research institution, in states where hemp cultivation was legal.

After the 2014 Farm Bill was passed, on June 6, 2014, then-California Attorney General Kamala Harris issued opinion 13-1102, which stated “Federal law authorized, and rendered operative, the relevant portions of the California Industrial Hemp Farming Act on February 7, 2014.” The opinion, however, noted that provisions of the CIHFA were “inoperative to the extent that they apply or pertain to any form of industrial hemp cultivation not authorized by federal law.” In other words, commercial cultivation was still not allowed. In 2016, the Control Regulate and Tax Adult Use Of Marijuana Act (or “Prop. 64”) was passed. Prop. 64 formally amended the above California Food & Agriculture Code sections to make the hemp provisions become effective on January 1, 2017.

In 2018, commercial cultivation began to become a reality with Senate Bill 1409. SB-1409 (which we have written about here, here, and here) allowed for the commercial cultivation of hemp upon registration with the state Department of Food and Agriculture (“CDFA”) and county commissioners, effective January 1, 2019. SB-1409 provides relatively sparse testing and other rules (at least in comparison to the highly regulated cannabis industry). After SB-1409 was passed, the CDFA issued proposed regulations in November 2018 for registering commercial cultivators, which appear to be under review with the California Office of Administrative Law (“OAL”) through April 3, 2019.

Part of the reason for the stalling out of the proposed regulations seems to be the 2018 Farm Bill, which was signed on December 20, 2018. The 2018 Farm Bill completely removed hemp from the Controlled Substances Act and require states to submit “hemp production plans” to the United States Department of Food and Agriculture for its approval. But notably, section 7605(b) of the 2018 Farm Bill extends the 2014 Farm Bill through one year after the USDA’s establishment of certain plans (which will be a while from now).

This is a lot to unpack, but the gist is that hemp cultivated pursuant to state law and provisions of the 2014 Farm Bill (i.e., not purely commercial hemp) will be permitted for now, but purely commercial hemp production may not be permitted until the establishment of USDA-approved plans. It will be interesting to see what happens come April 4 if the OAL approves the regulations that allow for commercial hemp cultivation even in spite of no plan being submitted to the USDA. As of now, it’s pure speculation, and I am not aware of any plan submitted by California to the USDA.

This brings us to today. Currently, California law allows for established research institutions to cultivate hemp if they provide certain information to county agricultural commissioners (subject to any state or local prohibitions, of course). The commercial hemp cultivation regulations haven’t been fully implemented as noted above. There are a few big outstanding questions today.

First, what happens if California allows commercial cultivation before or without submitting a plan to the USDA? We might then be in a world similar to cannabis, where the state has adopted laws and regulations that conflict with federal law. If cannabis is any sign, it may be that the federal government does not prioritize enforcement because California would have its own regulations. But there’s no guarantee as to how the federal government would react and in light of the FDA’s December 20, 2018 statement that hemp-derived CBD isn’t allowed in many commercial products, there may be more aggressive federal enforcement.

Problematically, even if California did allow commercial hemp cultivation, that hemp may get siloed in California or just in the nearby states that don’t block shipments. The 2018 Farm Bill does prevent states from interfering interstate shipment, but its terms seem pretty clear that this only applies to hemp produced pursuant to USDA-approved hemp production plans. Some arguments can be made that 2014 Farm Bill-produced hemp can be transported interstate pursuant to this provision, but the 2014 Farm Bill did not allow commercially grown hemp sales.

Another big question is whether hemp grown by an established agricultural research institute in California could be re-sold commercially. The current hemp law as amended by SB-1409 doesn’t speak to this issue, but these institutions may be concerned about selling hemp and may refuse to do it.

Like I have said many times before, the state of hemp law in California is perplexing. That rule is no different for cultivation than it is for the sale of hemp products. It’s always a good idea to consult with experienced California hemp lawyers when considering hemp cultivation or any other sort of hemp sales. As always, stay tuned to the Canna Law Blog for more California hemp updates.

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The Top 10 Popular Marijuana Strains in California

When it comes to marijuana, California is one of the most friendly states in the nation.

Not only is California one of 10 states that have legalized recreational marijuana, they were the very first to legalize medical marijuana back in 1996. With that in mind, using data compiled by Leafly below are the 10 most popular marijuana strains in California.

Ah, the well-known, well-loved, always-great Blue Dream. With Blueberry and Haze lineage, this strain delivers an uplifting, buzzy high, and a deliciously sweet and piney flavor. You can pretty much never go wrong with Blue Dream, which earns its place at the top of this list.

Girl Scout Cookies has shot into prominence in recent years. This is due in no small part to it’s wonderful taste, and euphoric high. This cross between OG Kush and Durban Poison is certainly a modern classic.

This cross between Super Skunk and Chemdawg is known for its strong, earthy and diesel-like smell. With a high that’s energetic and uplifting, while allowing for greater focus, makes it great for daytime use.

OG Kush is one of the most well-know cannabis strains ever, with even most non-consumers having heard of it. The classic combo of Hindu Kush and Chemdawg is easily one of the most loved and sought-after strains on the market.

Despite an unfortunate name that doesn’t do the cannabis movement any justice, Green Crack is an extremely popular and well-loved strain. Its popularity is due to its sweet, citrusy flavor and smell, and it’s strong buzzing high.

Jack Herer – named after the legendary activist and author – is a sativa-dominant cross between Northern Lights and Shiva Skunk that has a legendary reputation in its own right. It has a piney smell and flavor with a backdrop of citrus, and a smooth, even high.

As Leafly puts it: “When Skywalker met OG Kush, a beautiful baby was born. That baby is Skywalker OG, a strain that has earned its way to fame not by name (although that probably helped), but through potency and flavor. The THC content of this indica-dominant hybrid is certainly one to write home about, and I’ve seen the loud earthy and lemon flavors of this hybrid literally raise eyebrows.”

Bubba Kush is a definitive indica that has a potent head high that’s perfect for those trying to relax or get some sleep. With sweet hashish flavors with subtle notes of chocolate and coffee, Bubba Kush is a delight to smoke.

As noted by Leafly: “The predominant OG family has another prestigious strain in California, and its name is Fire OG. A cross of different OG Kush phenotypes, Fire OG takes on a fiery appearance with vibrant orange hair stretching out from a bed of crystal resin.”

SFV OG owes much of its greatness to its OG Kush lineage, but it separates itself with a unique flavor and smell.

The post The Top 10 Popular Marijuana Strains in California appeared first on TheJointBlog.

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New Developments Regarding Oregon Hemp

Last week, the Oregon Department of Agriculture (“ODA”) submitted a letter of intent to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (“USDA”) in which the state agency conveyed its decision to submit a state hemp plan, pursuant to the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (“2018 Farm Bill”).

In addition to legalizing the production of hemp by removing the crop from the list of controlled substances, the 2018 Farm Bill delegates to states and Indian tribes the broad authority to regulate and limit the production of hemp and hemp products within their territories. Specifically, Subtitle G of the new Farm Bill sets forth a regulatory scheme by which states and Indian tribes may seek primary regulatory authority over hemp production. To obtain primary regulatory authority, states and Indian tribes must submit a plan to the USDA Secretary for review and approval. However, before the Secretary may review and approve state plans it must promulgate rules and regulations pertaining to these plans.

As such, ODA Director Alexis Taylor expressed to the Secretary her department’s eagerness to receive direction from the USDA regarding requirements for state implementation plans. Specifically, Taylor raised the need for requirements in solving the growing confusion surrounding interstate transportation of hemp. The ODA Director explained that delays in rule making are subjecting Oregon’s hemp industry to “unnecessary transportation and commerce restrictions” and further stated that “having additional guidance to allow the flow of hemp in interstate commerce would be critical to farmers in Oregon.” Indeed, as we previously explained, the interstate transportation of hemp is lawful for hemp grown under a plan approved by the USDA, pursuant to the 2018 Farm Bill.

The ODA’s letter highlights the state’s robust regulation of the crop and the agency’s desire to remain at the forefront of hemp production. The ODA’s strong aspirations for hemp were also reflected domestically this past week. Indeed, a few days before it released its statement to the USDA, the Oregon department filed temporary hemp rules under Oregon Administrative Rules 603-048. The temporary rules, which became effective immediately, bring the ODA testing rules for industrial hemp intended for human consumption and hemp items in compliance with those of the Oregon Health Authority (“OHA”) as required by ORS 571.330. (That statute provides that industrial hemp intended for human consumption and hemp items must be tested similarly to marijuana under OHA’s rules. The OHA recently adopted new testing rules for marijuana, which forced the ODA to amend its rules.)

In addition to revising the ODA testing rules, the proposed rules clarify recordkeeping requirements. The Oregon department announced it would develop a template that registrant growers and handlers will be able to use to ensure their recordkeeping sufficiently meets ODA requirements. The template will be released on the ODA’s website as soon as it will be available. Finally, as we explained recently, the state legislature will likely pass a hemp bill this session.

For more information on Oregon hemp, please contact us.

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Smokeable Medical Marijuana Bill Passed by Florida Senate

Florida’s full Senate on Thursday passed a bill to repeal the state’s ban on smokeable medical marijuana.

The Senate passed Senate Bill 182 by a vote of 34 to 4, reports the Orlando Sentinel. The measure would allow medical marijuana patients to smoke marijuana, which was legalized by voters before being prohibited by lawmakers.

“Marijuana is now medicine in the state of Florida and how that medicine is administered should be between their doctor and that patient,” said Sen. Gary Farmer, D-Lighthouse Point.

As noted by the Sentinel, lawmakers in 2017 passed a law carrying out the legalization of medical marijuana approved by 71 percent of voters in 2016, but it barred patients from access to smokable marijuana, restricting them to oils and baked goods.

Advocates for the amendment including Orlando attorney John Morgan sued, and a lower court ruled last year the smoking ban was unconstitutional. After taking office in January, DeSantis told lawmakers he would drop the appeal of that decision, made by his predecessor Rick Scott, if they didn’t pass a new law by March 15.

A spokeswoman for DeSantis did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Sen. Rob Bradley, who sponsored the previous law banning smoking, defended the earlier position but said it was “time to move on.”

“We did what we thought was right for the health of the people of the state of Florida,” said Bradley, R-Fleming Island. “It’s time to move this discussion from Tallahassee to doctors’ offices around the state.”

Not all senators embraced the change. Sen. Keith Perry, who voted no, said smoking the drug isn’t healthy for any patient.

“Just think about why we’re even debating smoking marijuana – I can only figure it’s because that’s the way it’s been used illegally forever,” said Perry, R-Gainesville, who voted against the measure. “When you burn that and inhale it, it causes cancer.”

The other three no votes came from Sens. Doug Broxson, R-Gulf Breeze, George Gainer, R-Panama City, and Ed Hooper, R-Clearwater.

Some senators who weren’t convinced allowing patients to smoke marijuana was the right policy still voted for it because they feared lax regulations that would result if they didn’t act.

Other parts of the bill include $1.5 million a year for research, a parental notice requirement for patients under 18 to receive smokable medicine and requiring doctors to tell patients under 18 the negative effects of smoking marijuana.

Sen. Kelli Stargel said she didn’t support the original amendment allowing medical marijuana to begin with, but noted without a law to replace the old one, the court’s decision would stand on its own without new parameters for doctors, patients, growers and retailers.

“I believe it’s a gateway drug just like the opioid addictions we had that led to the use of heroin and fentanyl,” Stargel said. “Now we’re in a situation where if we do nothing the situation’s worse. We have basically little regulation.”

The House version of the bill is stricter than the Senate plan, including a complete ban on smokable marijuana for patients under 18.

But Senate bill sponsor Jeff Brandes, R-Clearwater, said he expects the House to pass the Senate’s version unchanged, sending it to DeSantis next week before the March 15 deadline.

Even then, Sen. Tom Lee sounded a warning about the “unintended consequences” of the bill. He cited concerns over workplace policies banning marijuana use coming into conflict with employees who use the medication.

“We’re not even close to done here,” said Lee, R-Thonotosassa. “I’ve watched this Senate and the House pass bill after bill over 22 years. I’ve watched the celebration and the victory lap and then I’ve watched us have to deal with the unintended consequences of what we did.”

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Report: Over 200,000 Full-Time Jobs Created by State-Legal Marijuana Businesses

Marijuana businesses that are legal under their state’s law hired 64,000 new employees in 2018, and now employs over 200,000 full-time workers, according to data compiled by Whitney Economics and Leafly.com.

The report, entitled Cannabis Jobs Count, identifies some 211,000 full-time jobs in the legal cannabis sector. This total increases to 296,000 jobs when ancillary employers are also included.

By comparison, 112,000 Americans are estimated to currently work in the textile industry, while only about 52,000 people are employed by the coal mining industry.

“[T]he legal cannabis industry remains a substantial and unrecognized engine of grassroots job creation,” authors concluded. “In fact, cannabis job growth is proceeding at double digit rates in many states despite being overtaxed locally and heavily penalized at the federal level.”

California (67,000 jobs) led the country in cannabis-related employment, followed by Washington (47,000 jobs), and Colorado (44,000 jobs).

The report states:

Some states that have had legal adult-use cannabis sales for a while now—Colorado and Washington opened their stores in 2014—are just now seeing the growth in cannabis jobs start to plateau.

Meanwhile, newly legal states, such as Florida (medical) and Nevada (adult use), are experiencing cannabis job booms with eye-popping gains:

    • Florida grew its cannabis employment by 703% in 2018, adding more than 9,000 full-time jobs.
    • Nevada added more than 7,500 jobs during that same year.
    • Pennsylvania ended 2017 with around 90 cannabis jobs. It ended the 2018 with nearly 3,900.
    • New York grew its cannabis employment by 278%, ending 2018 with more than 5,000 jobs.

Commenting on the findings, NORML Executive Director Erik Altieri said: “The federal government needs to deschedule marijuana to allow states to better and more fully benefit from the economic growth engine that is the legal marijuana industry. Further, state regulators need to ensure as this sector expands its economic benefits are shared by all, including and most especially by those who suffered most under the failed policy of criminal prohibition.”

According to a study conducted by BDS Analytics and released last year, those who consume marijuana work out more often than those who don’t, and are more likely to have a full-time job. The study separated people into three categories: Those who have consumed marijuana in the past six months, those who have not consumed marijuana in the past six months but are open to it (“acceptors”), and those who have not consumed marijuana in the past six months and aren’t open to doing so (“rejectors”).

The study found that the average age for marijuana consumers is 39. The average age for acceptors is 49, with the average age of rejectors being 56. Among consumers, 43% say they work out outdoors multiple times a week. This is significantly higher than acceptors (35%), and drastically higher than rejectors (just 25%). This trend is continued among those who work out multiple times a week at a gym; 40% among consumers, 30% among acceptors and 27% among rejectors.

The study also found that marijuana consumers are considerably more likely to have a full-time job. Among consumers, 53% have a full-time job, compared to 44% for acceptors and just 33% (less than 1 in 3) among rejectors. More information on this study can be found by clicking here.

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The Federal Legality of CBD Smokable Products

In the last few weeks, we have received a growing number of inquiries pertaining to the legality of smokable products infused with cannabidiol derived from industrial hemp (“CBD Smokables”), including vape pens and pre-rolled hemp flower joints. This post provides a brief overview of the current legal status of these products.

As we have discussed on several occasions (here and here), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) has yet to promulgate clear guidelines on CBD-infused products. While we know the FDA deems the sale and use of CBD in food and dietary supplements unlawful, the agency has yet to address its sale and use in tobacco products.

Indeed, the FDA has the authority to regulate the sale, manufacture, and marketing of tobacco products under the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (“TCA”). The TCA defines “tobacco product” as a “product made or derived from tobacco that is intended for human consumption, including any component, part, or accessory of a tobacco product.”

In 2016, the FDA expanded its regulatory authority to all products meeting the TCA’s statutory definition of a tobacco product, such as e-cigarettes, cigars, pipes and waterpipes.

However, the various statements published on the FDA’s website (here and here) seem to suggest that the agency currently refuses to interpret “tobacco products” so broadly as to include products free of nicotine or tobacco. Accordingly, it seems unlikely that CBD Smokables devoid of these substances would be considered “tobacco products.”

Although the federal agency is not likely to regulate most CBD Smokables as tobacco products at the moment, it could potentially regulate them as a drug under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (“FDCA”).

Under the FDCA, a drug is defined as “intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease” or “intended to affect the structure or any function of the body . . . .” Accordingly, the agency’s jurisdiction is triggered by the intended use of the product. Generally, intended use is determined on the basis of claims made in labeling, advertising and other promotion of the product. Therefore, any health claim made about CBD-infused products, including CBD Smokables, will be treated by the FDA as a drug.

Drugs are tightly regulated by the FDA and are subject to pre-market approval. Yet, as of the date of this post, the FDA has only approved CBD as a pharmaceutical drug in the treatment of epilepsy (Epidiolex). Accordingly, any health claim made about any CBD Smokable would lead the FDA to treat the product as a drug, and thus, would require the distributor to submit their product to the agency for pre-market approval before they can begin selling it in interstate commerce.

Until the agency makes a final determination and issues guidelines for CBD Smokables, no distributor will technically comply with current FDA rules. However, based on the FDA’s recent statements and past enforcement actions, said distributors can mitigate the risk of FDA enforcement by avoiding medical claims all together.

For additional information on CBD Smokables, please contact our team.

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Legislation to Regulate and Tax Marijuana in Vermont Passes Senate With Veto-proof Majority

A legislative proposal to tax and regulate marijuana for adult use in Vermont third and final reading in the Vermont Senate Friday with a veto-proof majority; the vote was 23 to 5.

The measure now moves to the Vermont House of Representatives for consideration. Passage in the House would send it to Governor Phill Scott for consideration.

Senate Bill 54, sponsored by 15 of the state’s 30 senators, would create a system of regulated marijuana production and sales for adult use in Vermont, reports the Marijuana Policy Project in a press release. Retail sales would be subject to a 10 percent tax, and municipalities could establish a 1 percent local option tax if they host a retailer. Under the proposal, oversight of the medical cannabis program would be shifted from the Department of Safety to a new independent commission beginning January 1, 2021. It would also change the word “marijuana” to “cannabis” throughout state statutes. A detailed summary of S. 54 is available at http://bit.ly/Vermont-S54.

Laws regulating and taxing cannabis for adult use have been enacted in nine states and the U.S. territory of the Northern Mariana Islands. Vermont and D.C. are the only two U.S. jurisdictions where cannabis is legal but not regulated for adult use.

“We applaud the Senate for its overwhelming approval of this commonsense legislation”, says Matt Simon, New England political director for the Marijuana Policy Project, which is leading a coalition in support of the legislation. “We hope members of the House will agree that regulating and taxing cannabis is in Vermont’s best interest. Most importantly, this legislation will make the state safer by creating a safe and legal market through which adults can access cannabis products. It will also have the added benefit of generating new tax revenue for the state, as well as local governments.”

Scott continues: “Cannabis is legal for adults in Vermont, and it’s time for it to be treated like other products that are legal for adults. That means regulating its production and sale to address public health and safety concerns and keep it out of the hands of minors. While some adults would prefer to grow their own cannabis, many would prefer to access it safely and legally from licensed stores. They should have the choice, and that is what this bill will provide.”

In January the state’s supreme court decided that the smell of burnt marijuana is not enough to justify law enforcement obtaining a warrant to search a vehicle.

In the ruling the court stated that the odor of burnt marijuana emanating from a vehicle is not strong enough evidence or sufficient probable cause to conduct legally search said vehicle.

“The seizure, aimed at immobilizing the plaintiff’s vehicle while the officer sought a search warrant, was essentially based solely on the trooper’s initial detection of the faint odor of burnt marijuana, which did not, in and of itself, create fair probability that marijuana would be found in the vehicle”, states the ruling.

The case, Zullo v. Vermont, effectively overturned a lower court decision.

Marijuana possession officially became legal in Vermont on July 1, 2018.

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The Current Top 10 Most Popular Marijuana Strains

Among the hundreds – if not thousands – of marijuana strains found around the world, here are the 10 most popular!

Blue Dream.

Using data compiled by Leafly, here are the 10 most popular marijuana strains at this very moment:

The Current 10 Most Popular Marijuana Strains:

  • Blue Dream

Blue Dream has remained a mainstay in the marijuana scene for decades. A sativa-dominant marijuana strain, Blue Drea, is a cross between the indica-dominant Blueberry and the sativa-dominant Haze. It’s known for its smooth and uplifting high, as well as its delicious blueberry flavor.

  • Sour Diesel

Sour Diesel is a cross between Super Skunk and Chemdawg, and it stands out due to its strong diesel smell, and its energetic and potent high.

  • Girl Scout Cookies

Girl Scout Cookies (GSC) is a popular mix between OG Kush and Durban Poison It has a powerful high that permeates the body, and a strong, sweet taste and smell.

  • Green Crack

Green Crack has an energetic high and a powerful body buzz that reaches the head. It has a sweet, almost citrus-like taste and smell. The name may not be doing the marijuana industry any favors, but those who try it can easily understand its popularity.

  • OG Kush

OG Kush has been one of the most popular strains for many years year. A cross between Hindu Kush and Chemdawg, OG Kush has an earthy, piney flavor, and a strong head high, that’s loved by many.

  • Granddaddy Purple

Granddaddy Purple is a powerful indica that’s a mix between Big Bud and Purple Urkle. With a berry-like flavor, this strain is a joy to smoke. It’s most known for its dense, kiefy nuggets.

  • Original Glue

Gorilla Glue #4 has been replaced on this list with Original Glue. According to Leafly, “Original Glue (GG4), developed by GG Strains, is a potent hybrid strain that delivers heavy-handed euphoria and relaxation, leaving you feeling “glued” to the couch. Its chunky, resin-covered buds fill the room with pungent earthy and sour aromas inherited from its parent strains, Chem’s Sister, Sour Dubb, and Chocolate Diesel. Taking first place in both the Michigan and Los Angeles 2014 Cannabis Cups as well as the High Times Jamaican World Cup, this multiple award-winning hybrid’s supremacy is no longer a secret, and consumers will search far and wide to get their hands sticky with Original Glue (GG4).”

  • Jack Herer

Jack Herer is a sativa-dominant strain named after the legendary activist and author. It’s a cross between Northern Lights and Shiva Skunk, with piney and citrusy smell and flavor, and a smooth long-lasting high.

  • White Widow

White Widow’s popularity is due to its energetic, uplifting and powerful high; its uniquely earthy flavor and smell also help it stand out. This strain is a mix between South American Sativa and South Indian Indica.

  • Bubba Kush

Bubba Kush is a powerful indica-dominant strain, known for its heavy relaxation-inducing effects. Although Bubba Kush isn’t a flashy strain, it remains popular for good reason; its strength and consistency.

For more information on these strains and hundreds of others, go to Leafly’s website by clicking here.

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